Articles Posted in Car Accidents

Depositphotos_25825003_xl-2015-1024x683With the holidays right around the corner, it’s a good time to be mindful of the risks associated with being on the roadways at this time of year and the need to drive with extra caution. While July 4th and New Year’s are statistically the deadliest holidays for traffic accidents, it might surprise some that Thanksgiving time is not far behind—even deadlier than Labor Day weekend.

In 2017, 528 people were killed nationwide in crashes during the four-day Thanksgiving holiday weekend, the busiest travel time of the year.

Because of the alcohol consumption associated with holidays, accidents inevitably rise at these times of the year. The two holidays with the highest total number of traffic fatalities, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), are New Year’s Eve/Day and the Fourth of July, which were virtually tied between 2010 and 2015 at an average of about 118 deaths annually. (July 4th is the deadliest day of the year for motorcyclists.)

Car Accidents and CelebritiesCar accidents are tragic to everyone involved. Since the invention of the automobile, millions of individuals have been either severely injured or killed, including celebrities. Many of these accidents were the result of driver mistakes, distracted driving, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, severe road conditions, speeding and more. The news takes notice when celebrities are injured or killed in car accidents, calling attention to how we all live vulnerable lives that could change instantly.

Famous individuals are not protected against tragic events that tend to affect each one of us the same way. The ten celebrities listed below were all severely injured or lost their lives in vehicle accidents.

Paul Walker

Different Ways to Commute and Get AroundDoes the way you choose to travel to work impact your likelihood of arriving in one piece? Although plenty of people are on-board with the concept of cycling for health or riding public transit for the environment, few consider changing their commuting practices for safety reasons. Here’s why they should probably start.

Commuting Around the US

It’s hard to get a feel for just how many accident victims got into collisions while they were on their way to work. In spite of highly detailed police reports, statistics agencies don’t really keep such fine-grained data. What one can reasonably say, however, is that commuters probably follow similar trends to those seen in the general population, albeit with a few critical distinctions.

We all try to be safe drivers, but every now and then we slip up. We’re human; it happens. But did you know that any time you are convicted of a traffic violation in Illinois, or you pay a ticket, points are added to your Illinois driving record? Unlike a shopping loyalty card, points on your driver license aren’t a good thing. The number of points assigned depends on the traffic violation and the severity of the offense, but if you receive convictions for multiple offenses in a 12-month period, Illinois authorities can revoke or suspend your driver’s license. Moreover, moving violations can drive up the cost of your auto insurance.

While you may receive points on your driver’s license due to traffic violations, the fate of your driving privileges is not the only consequence you have to worry about. These accidents often lead to severe injuries as well. In addition to facing fines from the Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles, you can find yourself paying for thousands in medical expenses, losing hours of work due to recovery time, and dealing with the emotional repercussions of the accident. Here’s what you need to know about the Illinois driver’s license point system, and how to navigate the injuries that arise as a result of these motor vehicle violations.

How Does the Illinois Driver License Point System Work?

Back and Neck Injuries are a Result in Rear End CollisionsRear-end collisions are incredibly common—in fact, according to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were over 2 million rear-end collisions in the U.S. in 2017. The number of rear-end collisions has actually gone up in recent years. Not only are they responsible for numerous injuries, but they also led to almost 2,500 fatalities during 2017. Rear-end collisions account for by far the highest number of collisions among all collisions with motor vehicles in transport.

The nature of a rear-end collision, where your vehicle is hit from behind by another vehicle, means that back and neck injuries are quite common. A lot of force travels through your vehicle and through your body during a rear-end collision, even a minor one, and that force can cause all sorts of damage to your neck, back and other parts of your body.

How Rear-End Collisions Cause Back Injuries

Connection between Teen Passengers & Motor Vehicle Accident RateTeenage Drivers with Teenage Passengers – A New Study

A study by AAA was released in May 2012 and it discussed the connection between teen drivers with other young passengers and fatal accidents. The study showed that the risk of fatal car accidents are dramatically increased when drivers of 16 or 17 have other teenage passengers. We can all understand why this would be true, the lack of concentration when driving isn’t quite second nature yet, and “trying to impress” can both attribute to this.

  • When a teen driver had a passenger in the car under 21 the chances of a fatal accidents is increased by 44%

what-is-the-most-dangerous-time-of-day-to-be-on-the-roadsWhen people come into my office seeking legal representation it is sometimes interesting to note that they believe that the time of day that they were on the road had nothing to do with their accident. Make no mistake about it, an automobile  accident can occur at any possible time, but that does not mean that there is not a significant distinction that determines what the most dangerous time of the day is to be on the road.

Statistics can help here

For example, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the most dangerous month to drive is August and the most dangerous day of the week to drive is Saturday. Considering it is always best to avoid potential problems and that 40,000 people lose their life in car accidents every single year in the United States alone, it is interesting enough to go beyond the numbers and see what he most dangerous time of the day to be driving is.

Famous People in Drunk Driving AccidentsWhile we often hold celebrities in high regard, in reality, they are everyday individuals like all of us. However, in some cases, their fame and unusual lifestyle create unique challenges that can result in making bad decisions that harm or kill others. Some celebrities have been filed guilty of drug charges, driving under the influence, manslaughter, financial problems and tax evasion that make headlines. Below is a list of 15 Famous individuals who work others in accidents involving alcohol.

Amy Locane

In 2010, law enforcement took Amy in the custody after she drove her vehicle into another car and killed a 60-year-old woman and critically injuring her husband. After being convicted of vehicular manslaughter, the judge sentenced the former “Melrose Place” actress to three years in prison.

Impaired Driving and AlcoholWhile drunk drivers have always been a serious problem on American roadways, in recent years, driving under the influence of drugs has become increasingly more prevalent nationwide, including in Illinois. The Governors Highly Safety Association (GHSA) released a vehicle crash data report involving fatally injured drivers. Studies have shown that nearly 45% of all driver suffering a fatal injury tested positive for drugs in their system, which is a significant rise from a decade ago when 26% of fatally injured motorists tested positive.

The GHSA-funded report revealed that in 2016, 38% of the car accident fatalities involving drugs involved marijuana, 16% tested positive with opioids in their system and 4% had both. More than half tested positive for at least two drug and 49% drivers that suffered a fatal injury with alcohol in their system also had tested positive for drugs. Results of the study showed that the effects of driving while impaired with alcohol or drugs tend to produce comparable results. However, law enforcement faces many challenges in identifying drug-impaired motorists behind the wheel. It can be extremely difficult to automatically detect a drug impairment. While there are dozens of illegal drugs and prescription medications that can impair a driver’s ability to operate their vehicle safely, developing an effective field test that can identify the diversity of most medications can be overwhelming. Currently, no equipment exists to help police officers measure drug impairment reliably while conducting a traffic stop. Presently, crash investigators must rely on of other methods including toxicology tests to establish legal liability.

The report shows that marijuana use while driving continues to increase at an alarming rate. In April 2017, twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Most recently, West Virginia authorized their citizens to have legal access to medical marijuana starting in July 2019. Other states allow recreational use including California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Washington State and the District of Columbia. Additionally, there are thirteen states not listed above that no longer criminalize possession of marijuana in small amounts.

California Law Driving With Hands and Without DevicesCalifornia is trying a bold new approach to the subject of distracted driving with the implementation of its newest law— if you are holding anything but the wheel, you will receive a ticket. Drivers no longer need to be caught in the actual act of making a call or texting and police officers can ticket them simply for having a mobile device such as a phone or tablet where it can be accessed behind the wheel. The law doesn’t just seek to reduce the number of drivers using their smartphones, but to eliminate their very presence from view.

Texting While Driving is the Single Largest Threat to Drivers in Recent History

Over the last fifty years, increased population and access to mobile technology have combined to give us the sharpest increases in traffic fatalities we have ever seen. 46 states have now outlawed texting and driving, but it can be extremely difficult for police officers to catch culprits red-handed. Previous incarnations of California’s law have not been deemed strict enough to help reverse this trend.