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Articles Tagged with spinal cord injury

Recovery from a spinal cordThere are approximately 400,000 people throughout the United States living with the effects of spinal cord injury (SCI) at any given time. Even though statistics show that spinal cord injuries are more prevalent amongst males, anyone who is involved in an accident could experience a spinal cord injury at any given time.

Two different types of SCI

When talking about spinal cord injuries, there are two different types. These include the complete spinal cord injury (meaning the patient loses complete lack of function any lower than their injury) and the incomplete spinal cord injury (there is some feeling and sensation below the injury). The degree and level of functioning is dependent upon the patient and in which way and how severely the spinal cord was damaged.

As a Chicago personal injury lawyer, I everyday seems to remind me that back and neck injuries are indeed serious injuries that can result in permanent disability, paralysis, or even death.  Back and injuries can involve the bone, muscle, or soft tissue.  Common injuries include strains and sprains, fractured vertebrae, sciatica, and herniated disks.

The most common location for back injuries and back pain is the lower back because the lower back supports your body weight.  80% of people will experience low back pain at some point in their lives.  Common causes of back and neck injuries include trauma (falls, motor vehicle accidents, sports, birth injury), arthritis, cancer, degenerative conditions, and surgical injury.

Back Pain

Paralysis means the loss of muscle function in a part of the body.  If the paralysis is caused by a spinal cord injury (SCI), it is further classified as a complete or an incomplete injury.

A complete injury is where the spinal cord cannot convey any messages to the body below the injury, resulting in a complete loss of sensory and motor function.  An incomplete injury is where the spinal cord can still convey some messages to and from the body below the injury.

Spinal cord injuries are also classified by the level of the injury (also known as a lesion), which refers to the spinal cord segment where the injury occurred.  In the United States, about 1,275,000 people have suffered spinal cord injuries (men account for 61% of all SCIs).  And about 5,596,000 people in the United States have suffered some form of paralysis.